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Posted by on Jun 4, 2012 in Social Networks |

Facebook is considering “clean” access to children under 13 years

(Cc) flickr radioflyer007

has a high level of children among its users, who often move the needle of the statistics are on average as those who spend more hours in front of the computer or phone. But when you get a statistic just close to the number of children who use the social network, this value drops to nothing because of the millions of children under 13 years, ignoring the restrictions on use, are discharged profiles lying on your age.

In practice we see every day, even we have a sibling, cousin or brother of a friend by sending requests for games, memes, or questionnaires adolescents. What you may not notice them but some adults if it is that the level of exposure and very low overall filter less often used for privacy or environment, create an enabling environment for all types of crimes.

This alarm appears to have noticed the Facebook headquarters, where they would be testing some tools to modify the levels of access to certain content and features, whitening and legalize access to children under 13 years but within a framework of control and protection of both of their identity and their data.

This technology would be designed so that when the child creates a social network account, must associate it with that of an older, who is the guardian of the child within the network. This formally placed under the responsibility of adults to authorize certain actions required by the child to connect with other users or install any application.

Of course this kind of updates only disturb children today, without any control of both their families and the social network can navigate freely, accept friend requests from strangers and share tastes, images or content with anyone.

Discourage the children to use the social network such modification or soften the parents that currently forbid their children to create a profile?

Link: Facebook looking to add access for children under 13 (theverge)

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