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Posted by on Aug 7, 2012 in Social Networks |

Facebook: The ‘I like’ should be protected by freedom of expression

Facebook: The 'I like' should be protected by freedom of expression

(CC) Ksayer1

In 2009 the Sheriff BJ Roberts of Hampton City, Virginia, repostulaba charge through a popular election against Jim Adams. Seeing that six employees of the Department supported his opponent, dismissed as Roberts was re-elected, which caused him to be sued by assuring employees that violated their freedom of expression.

The interesting thing is that one of the workers, Daniel Ray Carter, had given only the button ‘I like’ the page of the Sheriff’s opponent, to what the judge in the case, Raymond A. Jackson, decided in May this year that is not an act protected by as a statement as insufficient public. That is for the judge, give the button ‘I like’ is not the same as writing a manifesto and post it on a website.

But now Daniel Ray Carter has a powerful ally in Judicial appeal, as the social network publicly gave his support saying the company has “a vested interest in ensuring that express themselves through Facebook or any other online community has the same constitutional guarantees to be expressed in a newspaper, on television or in public space. “

“When Carter expressed his support for the opponent of Sheriff Roberts that gesture was visible to friends, family and colleagues. If he had stopped at a corner and shouted ‘I want Jim Adams is the Sheriff of Hampton!’, There would be no doubt that would be protected by freedom of expression, “said Facebook in its statement, those who say ‘I like’ is equivalent to a sticker on a car or a sign nailed in the yard of a house with a political statement.

It is estimated that this case will set a precedent about the enormous freedom of expression in social networks, so it’s quite nice to see Facebook presented its position on such a clear and public.

Link: Facebook says ‘Likes’ fall under free speech, supports sheriff fired over Political controversy (The Verge)

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