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Posted by on Jun 2, 2012 in Internet |

FBI is concerned that the arrival of IPv6 will complicate your network monitoring

FBI is concerned that the arrival of IPv6 will complicate your network monitoring

(Cc) kalavinka

This June 6 officially starts operating worldwide IPv6 , the new communications protocol, it will allocate new IP addresses. Since 1981 he had been using IPv4, allowing a total of 2 ^ 32 addresses, which are already almost sold out, making it necessary to implement the new system that allows 2 ^ 128 addresses, which should reach for future years and to be internet connect washing machines, cars, microwaves, smartphones, etc..

However, this expansion of the number of IP addresses has not pleased everyone. The in the United States expressed concern that this technical change hinder their research, and you may need new tools for this task.

As the number of IPs increase, and each device (either a washer or a smartphone) will have its own IP, the ISP can no longer respond as quickly to the information requirements requested by the FBI.

Moreover, the adoption of will be gradual, and the new protocol coexist with IPv4 for some time. To make both systems work at the same time, ISPs have begun to adopt systems of transition or “translation” of addresses.

One of these systems allows an IPv4 address is shared between several households (up to hundreds of them), so that by tracking the number, it is impossible to arrive at a single point. To identify a user, the ISP will need to gather more information about individuals to identify them, such as ports, addresses and time, which means that more data should be stored (incurring more expenses).

It is not yet clear the impact of IPv6, but this is interesting “side effect”.

Link: FBI: New Internet addresses Investigations Could hinder police (CNET)

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