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Posted by on Jun 20, 2013 in Hardware News |

Medical professors use large 3D holograms to teach medicine in England

Medical professors use large 3D holograms to teach medicine in England

Two doctors in London have developed this 3D animation system, which can become a great visual tool in medical education.

Doctors used a 3D graphic of a kidney, four feet high, to explain renal function test at a conference last week.

It was one of a series of hologram type animations. The effects were developed by Dr. Kapil Sugand, who works in the Saint George Hospital and Imperial College, London, and Dr. Pedro Campos, Saint George Hospital.

These animations are not true holograms, are based more on an illusion called “Pepper’s Ghost”, which uses glass or aluminum foil, combined with special lighting techniques to make objects appear in the air.

Medical professors use large 3D holograms to teach medicine in England image 2

Images are animated and can be controlled by the teacher. Three projectors are used to generate the images on stage. The system is designed to be used in a large auditorium.

The doctors said they wanted to make it easier for students to absorb the large amount of details needed to pass the exams. Medical students have up to nine hours of classes per day, and studies last six years.

“Research in science education have shown that the attention span of the average student is 20 to 30 minutes, but the standard presentations last at least an hour.” Says Dr. Sugand. (Things have changed over time. Remember my years in college, where they often had to listen to a “master class” of two hours or more without pause. Was common to sleep in the auditorium, especially after lunch.)

Medical professors use large 3D holograms to teach medicine in England image 3

“The human body is a very complex machine. It is very difficult to understand and appreciate how the kidney or liver function from PowerPoint slides. “He added.

Although the human body “holographic” has already been tested in an anatomy class at Imperial College, has been aimed at a mass audience, said Dr. Sugand. “This could be a way to teach surgical procedures to a large group of students quite easily,” he added.

Link: Large 3D ‘holograms’ created, will be used to aid medical student training (tweaktown.com)

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