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Posted by on Sep 22, 2012 in Science |

NASA says that the speed “warp” is more than we thought possible

(CC) Will Wheaton

The warp speed (thrust or curvature) is a theoretical way to move faster than the Speed of light that was popularized in the television series Star Trek. The concept for this method of transport can be performed in the real world was demonstrated by the Mexican physicist Miguel Alcubierre in 1994, but claimed that the calculations needed unattainable amount of energy .

The Alcubierre warp drive would be a spacecraft with a large oval ring around. This ring, made with ‘exotic matter’, should have the ability to change the space-time around the ship, creating a region of space-time and one tablet in front of spacetime expanded back, all without modifying spacetime of the ship itself.

(CC) NASA

This would allow the spacecraft to move theoretically 10 times the speed of light without breaking the laws of physics , as long as we could generate Oct. 45 Joules of energy (that’s about the energy contained in the mass of Jupiter).

As this figure is unattainable for our civilization, for years the was sent to a fantasy of science fiction, however, physicists from NASA said that some concepts can be adjusted to Alcubierre warp drive to be feasible with significantly less energy. “There is hope,” said Harold “Sonny” White , Johnson Center of NASA in the symposium spacecraft 100 years .

The new approach is to replace the ring-shaped ‘exotic matter’ with a toroidal shape (ie donut shaped , Hmmm donuts ), Reducing the energy needed to propel the ship to the equivalent mass of Voyager 1, launched in 1977. In addition, it could reduce even more the amount of energy if the intensity is oscillated modification of spacetime around the ship.

“The results presented warp speed change impractical to plausible, and needs to be further investigated,” said White. I at least I have clear where traveling if you could.

Link: Warp Drives Might Be More Realistic Than Thought (Wired)

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