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Posted by on Nov 13, 2012 in Science |

Neural electrodes create about 100 times thinner than conventional metal

Neural electrodes create about 100 times thinner than conventional metal

The problem in connecting the human to a computer is not only biological, but also a problem of materials science, because in addition to an interface must be sufficiently low to avoid damaging invasive tissue must also be resistant to last for decades.

To solve this problem, a team of scientists developed an dubbed “stealth neural interface”, made from a single strand of fiber and coated with chemicals to resist brain proteins, as with conventional time stop working because the lining of the brain scar tissue.

The new electrode, the thinner it is manufactured, is designed to pick up signals from a single neuron, and is 7 microns in diameter, about 100 times thinner than conventional metal electrodes used to study the of animals.

“We wanted to see if we could radically alter neural technology,” said Takashi Kozai , a researcher at the University of Pittsburgh and the head of the team of scientists. “We wanted to develop an electrode that lasts 70 years.”

Link: A Carbon MicroThread That Makes Contact with the Mind (Technology Review)

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