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Posted by on May 24, 2012 in Science |

Robofish: The fish robot that can sniff out and clean up pollution at sea

Robofish: The fish robot that can sniff out and clean up pollution at sea

REUTERS / SHOAL Consortium / Handout

When I read this news I thought “why do we need a fish robot with all the beautiful species we have in our seas and rivers? But after going a little deeper into the subject saw that, like so many other robots, this water project is here to stay and try to fix some of the many damages that man is causing the planet.

Robofish is part of the SHOAL project , in which a group of scientists has developed a series of robotic fish capable of monitoring a number of pollutants in the waters to report their location long before it affected marine life and water.

The model shown is 1.5 meters and is already working full time in the waters of the northern port of Gijon, Spain, determining in real time the type of contamination, leakage of fluid of some boats or illegal dumping, to combat immediately.

For this work, the fish robot using an electrode system with which sniff various pollutants according to a pattern in its database. They now have ability to sniff and detect phenols, heavy metals and measure oxygen levels and salinity.

According to the scientist Rebecca Boyle, these robots inspired by the appearance of a fish are much more efficient and simpler to manage than any other vehicle or self propeller style mini submarines since their movements allow you to turn in a very small radius and also disengage from algae and debris.

These prototypes cost about U.S. $ 30 000, must be replenished every eight hours through a base and can coordinate their movements or default route for them to move in shoal with other fish robot.

Despite its cost, this fish robot could minimize the nearly $ 2 billion of losses due to costs associated with pollution from the Spanish port which serves for a week.

Link: Giant ocean european Robofish sniff out pollutants autonomously (PopularScience)

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