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Posted by on May 31, 2013 in Science |

Scientists create microscopic resin for molding complex 3D structures

Scientists create microscopic resin for molding complex 3D structures

Japanese scientists have created a a great and interesting implications for future bionics, by allowing them to mold highly conductive complex three-dimensional structures at the level to create, among other things, that could be implanted in the brain to treat epilepsy or Parkinson’s disease.

The initial problem which led to the development of this method is that when subjected to high temperatures commonly resin so that the surface carbon becomes more conductive and thus electricity – the structure is broken, leaving as an amorphous figure impossible to shape the level of detail needed to create a delicate and precise medical implant.

To fix this, the researchers created a new type of resin made ​​with high concentrations of a material called resorcinol diglycidyl ether, which has been previously used to dilute other resins, and for building such detailed figures as Stanford bunny (so called because is an old test model created three dimensional graphics at the University of Stanford in 1994) the size of a bacterium by a laser microscope serves almost as a chisel and hammer.

Scientists create microscopic resin for molding complex 3D structures image 2

(C) Daicho Yuya, Murakami Terumasa, Tsuneo Hagiwara, Shoji Maruo, Opt. Mater. Express 3, 875-883 (2013)

Links:
Formation of three-dimensional Microstructures coal via two-photon microfabrication and microtransfer molding (Optics Info Base)
Bacterium-Sized Bunny This Could Be The Future Of Bionic Brains (Popular Science)

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